Posts filed under Attractions, Uncategorized

Central Park Boat Landings

When Central Park was opened in the 1860’s, there were 6 boat landings built around the area known as the Lake. The Lake covers 18 acres and was once a swamp that Olmsted and Vaux designed to hug the natural rock outcrops. Passenger boats were able to pick up and drop off passengers at the 6 landings, as well as the steps leading to the Bethesda Terrace & Fountain. Each landing was unique to the area along the lake. The largest boat landing...

Read More »

Top 10 Locations to Visit on the West Side of Central Park

Central Park is beautiful in all seasons and weather. No matter how many times you walk through the Park, there is always something new to see and discover. As every New Yorker knows, there has been a lifelong battle of the west side vs the east side. This blog will take you through a walk of some of the highlights of what to see on the west side of Central Park, starting at Columbus Circle and working up to the...

Read More »

5 Little Known Facts About Central Park

  1. Central Park was America’s first landscaped park in 1867 2. The Conservatory Gardens is 6 acres and is made up of three gardens, Italian, French and English Style gardens. 3. The Delacorte Clock is made up of three tiers which includes dancing animals. It chimes every 1/2 hour from 8am – 6pm, and the music changes with the seasons. 4. The Swedish Cottage was a real school house and came over from Sweden in 1867. It is now home to parties and...

Read More »

Top 10 Off-The-Beaten Path Areas to Visit in Central Park

Have you ever taken the path less traveled through Central Park? In the past 5 years the number of tourists and residents who visit Central Park has increased from 35 million people to 42 million. If you are in search of a little peace and quiet we have assembled a list of 10 places to visit in Central Park that are off the beaten path. 1. Cop Cot   Located right in the entrance at Central Park South and 6th Avenue. Cop Cot...

Read More »

10 of The Most Popular Movies Shot in Central Park

In 1908, Vitagraph Studios shot the very first movie in Central Park:  the first film version of Romeo and Juliet made in America. Since then, close to 350 movies have been filmed there, making Central Park the most filmed location in the world. This does not include aerial shots of the Park, TV shows or commercials. In honor of the  Central Park Conservancy’s upcoming annual Film Festival running from August 24 – 27 this year, we have prepared a list of our...

Read More »

THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL PARK~NEW YORK

Thank you to Rachel Brown @Rachelphotoblog (Twitter) who wrote this blog for us after her visit to NYC and Central Park last fall. Rachel is a travel and lifestyle photo blogger who lives in Australia. THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL PARK~NEW YORK It’s easy to forget that you are in a crowded city while walking through this spectacular park! The original plan for the City of New York, laid out by the City Commissioners in 1811 did not include the park. As...

Read More »

These are my favorite things to do in Central Park with my son who has autism.

We would like to thank Dana Greenberg as a guest blogger. She has created a list of ways that she and her son, who has autism, can enjoy Central Park together. We love the fact that she has allowed us to share her experiences and thoughts on the park with our followers. Dear readers, My thirteen-year-old son has autism, and we live in the greatest city in the world—New York City! The one thing we do not have is a backyard, so...

Read More »

Quiet, Raw and Coiffed in North Central Park

       Written by guest blogger, Joseph Kellard May 5, 2016 Far from the buzz and bustle of Midtown are the northern sections of Central Park, where fewer travelers and comparative quiet are the norms. But like their southern and central cousins, the park’s upper stretches are a mix of the landscaped and the raw and rugged, perhaps more so than any other area. There is Conservatory Garden that showcases finely coiffed hedge and tree rows and colored-aligned flower beds alongside sophisticated...

Read More »

10 Little Known Facts About the Central Park Obelisk (Cleopatra’s Needle)

  The obelisk set sail from Egypt on June 12, 1880, and reached New York a little over a month later. It took another five months for the artifact to reach Central Park. The obelisk’s pedestal weighs 50-tons, and it took 32 horses to pull it from West 51st Street to the park The monument was towed up the Hudson River to 96th Street on pontoons. A special rail track was built to move the obelisk through the city at a rate of one...

Read More »

Playgrounds of Central Park

There are currently 21 playgrounds in Central Park, and through the Central Park Conservancy’s Central Play program and their Playground Partners, each one is going through (or has gone through) a major overhaul and renovation.  Some are having original concepts reincorporated into their design, such as the recently re-opened Adventure Playground. This program was initiated in 1991 by the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy. Playground Partners is a group of volunteers who ensure that Central Park’s 21 playgrounds are kept safe and...

Read More »

Seneca Village

In commemoration of Black History Month, let’s take a brief look at the history of Seneca Village, the first significant community of African American property owners in Manhattan. Seneca Village existed in the area between 82nd to 85th street along Central Park West from 1825-1857, before the development of Central Park. Subsequently it was taken over via buyouts, and eventually in 1857 the city government acquired all private property within Seneca Village through eminent domain. After its destruction, the public...

Read More »

This Month is Central Park Statue Month.

This month is Central Park Statue Month. Located around the Central Park Mall and its perimeter, are scattered many statues and monuments. While some have become well known such as the Angel of the Waters, Balto, Alice in Wonderland, many are often passed by without giving them a second look. This bust of Ludwig van Beethoven is one of them. It is located on the west side of the Mall, across from the Bandshell. It was donated to the park by...

Read More »

Bethesda Fountain

Bethesda Fountain is believed to be the most photographed monument in Central Park. The bronze sculpture is called the Angel Of The Waters and symbolizes the purification of the NYC water’s supply, which happened in 1842 with the opening of the Croton Aqueduct. Below the angel are 4 cherubs that represent the Victorian sentiments of Purity, Peace, Temperance and Happiness. The statue was unveiled in 1873, it was designed by Emma Stebbins.

Read More »

Ice Skating In Central Park

Before there was a Wollman or Lasker Rink, people have been ice skating in Central Park since the 1860’s. Owning ice skates prior to that time was very expensive and were owned primarily by the wealthy. Even before Central Park was completed in the 1870’s, the area known as the “skating pond” on the original Greensward Plan (The Lake) was opened to the public. Once the “Skating Pond opened in the park, the cost of skates dropped to 25 cents...

Read More »

Glen Span Arch

The walk from the Harlem Meer to the Pool was designed to be one of the great landscape sequences in Central Park. With the construction of Lasker swimming pool and skating rink, the flow was obstructed. If one starts at the area known as the pool and walks east one will discover the beauty of the numerous waterfalls, bridges and arches that are located along the route. Included in this, is the Glen Span Arch, which was designed to act...

Read More »